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USING THIS PLANT: OAK




  • Primary Uses:

    • Nut – the “acorn” is typically dried and ground as “meal” or “flour”. Only a few species or improved hybrids have seeds that can be eaten raw (Quercus ilex)
    • Oil – only a few species have seeds that can be pressed to expel edible oil (Quercus ilex)
    • Young Leaves – cooked. Only a few oaks (Quercus acutissima) have edible leaves.
    • Coffee – The seed can be roasted and used as a coffee substitute.

    Secondary Uses:

    • General insect nectar and pollen plant
    • Wildlife food
    • Wildlife shelter
    • Windbreak
    • Most species can be coppiced – every 7-30 years depending on the size wood desired.
    • Wood is highly prized for finish carpentry, furniture, tools, barrels, crafts, baskets, as well as posts, fencing, stakes, wedges, roof shingles, firewood, and charcoal.
    • Wood and acorn shells can be used for tanning.
    • Wood can be used for mushrooms (shiitake!)

    Yield: highly variable on species and size of the tree. For example, Q. acutissima can produce up to 125 lbs (56 kg) of acorns per year.

    Harvesting: Autumn (October-November). Acorns are harvested after they have fallen from the tree.
    Storage: Can be used right away, but can be stored for months if kept dry.

    Beautiful photo of Oak leaves in Autumn
    White Oak (Quercus alba)
    (http://stillblog.net/?p=1417 … this is a beautiful blog!)

     

    Oaks are just impressive trees!

    DESIGNING WITH THIS PLANT
    USDA Hardiness Zone:

    • Sawtooth/Sawthorn Oak (Quercus acutissima) – Zone 5
    • Encina or California Live Oak (Quercus agrifolia) – Zone 8
    • White Oak (Quercus alba) – Zone 4
    • Boz-Pimal Oak (Quercus aucheri) – Zone 8
    • Swamp White Oak (Quercus bicolor) – Zone 4
    • Turkey Oak (Quercus cerris) – Zone 7-9
    • Kermes Oak (Quercus coccifera) – Zone 6
    • Scarlet Oak (Quercus coccinea) – Zone 4
    • Blue Oak (Quercus douglasii) – Zone 7
    • Black Oak (Quercus emoryi) – Zone 7 
    • Hungarian Oak (Quercus frainetto) – Zone 6
    • Gambel or Shin Oak (Quercus gambelii) – Zone 4
    • Glaucous-Leaf Oak or Japanese Blue Oak (Quercus glauca) – Zone 7
    • Holly Oak (Quercus ilex) – Zone 7
    • Holm Oak (Quercus ilex ballota) – Zone 7
    • Valonia Oak (Quercus ithaburensis macrolepis) -Zone 7
    • Californian Black Oak (Quercus kelloggii) – Zone 7-9
    • Bull Oak (Quercus lamellose) – Zone 8
    • Overcup Oak (Quercus lyrata) – Zone 5
    • Burr Oak (Quercus macrocarpa) – Zone 2-8
    • Chinkapin Oak (Quercus meuhlenbergii) – Zone 4
    • Swamp Chestnut Oak (Quercus michauxii) – Zone 6
    • Mexican Blue Oak (Quercus oblongifolia) – Zone 7
    • Pin Oak (Quercus palustris) – Zone 5-8
    • Dwarf Chinkapin Oak (Quercus prinoides) – Zone 5
    • Chestnut Oak (Quercus prinus) – Zone 5
    • English or Pedunculate Oak (Quercus robur) – Zone 4
    • Red Oak (Quercus rubra) – Zone 3
    • Post Oak (Quercus stellata) – Zone 5
    • Cork Oak (Quercus suber) – Zone 7
    • Live Oak (Quercus virginiana) – Zone 7
    • Sierra Live Oak (Quercus wislizeni) – Zone 8

    AHS Heat Zone:

    • Sawtooth/Sawthorn Oak (Quercus acutissima) – Zone 8-3
    • Encina or California Live Oak (Quercus agrifolia) – Zone 12-9
    • White Oak (Quercus alba) – Zone 8-1
    • Swamp White Oak (Quercus bicolor) – Zone 8-1
    • Turkey Oak (Quercus cerris) – Zone 8-1
    • Scarlet Oak (Quercus coccinea) – 9-4
    • Blue Oak (Quercus douglasii) – Zone 9-1
    • Glaucous-Leaf Oak or Japanese Blue Oak (Quercus glauca) – Zone 9-4
    • Holly Oak (Quercus ilex) – Zone 9-2
    • Californian Black Oak (Quercus kelloggii) – Zone 9-5
    • Bull Oak (Quercus lamellose) – Zone 8
    • Overcup Oak (Quercus lyrata) – Zone 8-4
    • Burr Oak (Quercus macrocarpa) – Zone 9-1
    • Chinkapin Oak (Quercus meuhlenbergii) – Zone 8-2
    • Swamp Chestnut Oak (Quercus michauxii) – Zone 9-3
    • Pin Oak (Quercus palustris) – Zone 7-3
    • Dwarf Chinkapin Oak (Quercus prinoides) – Zone 8-1
    • Chestnut Oak (Quercus prinus) – Zone 8-1
    • English or Pedunculate Oak (Quercus robur) – Zone 8-3
    • Red Oak (Quercus rubra) – Zone 9-5
    • Post Oak (Quercus stellata) – Zone 9-4
    • Cork Oak (Quercus suber) – Zone 12-3
    • Live Oak (Quercus virginiana) – Zone 11-6
    • Sierra Live Oak (Quercus wislizeni) – 10-6

    Chill Requirement: likely, but no reliable information can be found

    Plant Type: Medium to large-sized Shrubs; medium to large-sized Trees
    Leaf Type: Evergreen or Deciduous depending on the species
    Forest Garden Use: Canopy Layer, Sub-Canopy (Understory) Layer, Shrub Layer
    Cultivars/Varieties: Many species, hybrids, and varieties available.

    Pollination: Oaks require cross-pollination. This can come from just about any other species of oak. Pollinated by the wind.
    Flowering: late Spring to mid-Summer

    Life Span:
    Years to Begin Bearing: 5-35 years depending on the species
    Years Between Major Cropping: 1-10 years depending on the species.
    Years of Useful Life: 200 years is considered young for most species. Oaks can live to 400 years if not cut down. There is an oak over 2,000 years old in California.

    The Pechanga Great Oak, outside of Temecula, California, is over 2,000 years old.
    Encina or California Live Oak (Quercus agrifolia)

     

    Oak leaves can be extremely variable. Each species is different.
    Original Article Here

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